Built For Speed: Danner Desert TFX G3

May 31, 2017 2 min read

Rugged, lightweight, breathable, supportive, versatile, gutsy, aggressive and pure comfort! 

Danner Desert TFX G3

The Danner Desert TFX G3 is designed for the modern warrior. Built with speed and comfort in mind the Danner TFX is an ideal boot made to go the distance over almost any terrain.

Danner Desert TFX G3 - Tactical Source

When it comes to survival, a good pair of boots are often overlooked. The Danner Desert TFX G3 features a rugged and aggressive outsole and Danner's patented lightweight Terra Force X System, which provides stability and support.

Where does the Danner TFX excel? Most of our customers and mates who have spent time in hot, humid and sandy conditions have all pointed out the relief on your feet offered by these boots. Featuring a breathable, moisture wicking mesh lining, the Danner's are ideal for conditions stated above! Having worn these myself, I cannot agree more! When I first wore the Danner Desert TFX G3, I was surprised that there was no break in required whatsoever. I recently wore them on a trip to outback Australia and couldn't fault them in those conditions as they stood up to every task I put them through - carrying 18kg's on my back, climbing, running or crawling they proved to go the distance while remaining comfortable.

Danner Desert TFX G3 - Tactical Source

The Desert TFX military boot also features a speed lace system for a quick, secure fit, and beveled lugs which prevent debris build-up. The boot utilises non-magnetic metal hardware for increased durability.

Summary: While the Danner Desert TFX G3 isn't the only player in town, they are definitely worth a look at!

Shop Danner Desert TFX G3 here!

 

About Danner

Charles Danner opened the doors of Danner Shoe Mfg. Company in the old logging town of Chippewa Falls, Wis., with twelve employees to build affordable, handcrafted work boots. The U.S. was in the midst of the Great Depression, labor costs were about 30 cents per hour, and leather and other necessary raw materials were dirt cheap. The finished boots sold for less than $4 a pair.

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